Grammar Info

N4 Lesson 8: 8/18

んだけど

But..., And...

Versions without ん/の are also acceptable but ん/の version is more common nowadays.

Structure

Phrase (A) + のだ(1) + (2) + Phrase (B)

(1) んだ
(2) けれどもけれどけどもけど

Details

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    Standard

  • 使用域

    一般

About んだけど・んですが

んだけど is an expression that combines んだ (explaining/giving cause), with けど (but). Together they translate simply as 'but...', although the nuance is actually closer to 'but with (A) as the reason… (B)', while (B) is sometimes left unsaid. This implies that the speaker is looking for a reply, or does not want to say the (B) part of the sentence out of politeness/awkwardness.
  • (たす)んだけど一人(ひとり)できるから(かえ)てもいい
    I feel like you are being helpful, but I can handle it by myself, so you can go home.
  • (わたし)明日(あした)()()のですが先輩(せんぱい)()ませんか
    I am going to go fishing tomorrow, but senpai, do you also want to go?
  • (あたら)パソコン()たいのだけど...どれ()ばいい()からない
    I want to buy a new computer, but… I don't know which one to buy.
There are several different forms of this construction that are mostly interchangeable with each other. From most casual, to most formal, they are as follows:
んだけどんだけれどんだけれどもんだがんですが
may be replaced with in any of the above expressions. However, it will again make it slightly more formal.
Caution
んだが, or simply だが is probably the 'strongest' out of these possibilities, and is considered quite masculine. If you are going to use this form, we recommend making sure that your tone is a bit softer, so that it does not sound too authoritative.
Fun Fact
ん (or の) may sometimes be omitted completely, but this is not so common in modern Japanese.
  • (かお)いいのだけど...性格(せいかく)(わる)
    He has a good looking face, but… his personality is bad.

Examples

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  • 明日(あした)映画館(えいがかん)()かない?」
    ()きたいんだけど (明日(あした)試験(しけん)があるから()けない)。」

    'Won't you go to the cinema tomorrow?'
    'I'd like to go, but… (I have an exam tomorrow, so I can't).'

    • (あたら)しい時計(とけい)()いたいのですが (どちらいいでしょうか)。

      I would like to buy a new watch, but… (which one would be good?)

      Depending on context, this can be translated as 'and' or nothing at all.

      • 昨日(きのう)告白(こくはく)どうなった?」
        「こくはくしたんだけど (ふられた)。」

        'How did yesterday's confession go?'
        'I confessed but… (I was rejected).'

        • (まど)()いているからちょっと(さむ)んですが (どう(まど)()めていただけませんか?)。

          Since the window is open, it is a bit cold (and…) (I wonder if you wouldn't mind closing it?).

          • あの(おとこ)(かお)いい。」
            (かお)いいんだけど (なんか性格(せいかく)わるそう)。」

            'That guy, he has nice features, don't you think?'
            'He has nice features, but… (It seems that he has a bad personality).'

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            んだけど・んですが – Grammar Discussion

            Most Recent Replies (20 in total)

            • Megumin

              Megumin

              @mrnoone

              The questions are updated on the grammar point but on the lesson it still appears like they used to be. Do you know if there’s some sort of weird cache going on?

            • Superpnut

              Superpnut

              I have a question about the red squared caution information.

              " Caution - んだが, or simply だが is probably the ‘strongest’ out of these possibilities, and is considered quite masculine. If you are going to use this form, we recommend making sure that your tone is a bit softer, so that it does not sound too authoritative. "

              When it says it is quite masculine does that mean that two men would use that form when talking to each other? Or I guess…what makes it masculine? Would it be rude for a girl to say it or for it to be said to a girl?

            • FredKore

              FredKore

              It means that usually only men use that form. Imagine the ‘big boss’ stereotype – very gruff, easy to anger, laughs loud, expects obedience from everyone – for the image of “quite masculine”. I’m exaggerating, of course, but in that direction.
              It only reflects on the speaker, so it wouldn’t necessarily be bad to say to a woman, just kinda rough to hear. It could be said by a woman but it’s probably very unusual. (I’m not saying anything is absolute in this day and age.)

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